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Chocolate and orange marble cake

The Sovereign's Birthday Parade

Kenton

The Second World War

Barking

Tughra of Suleyman the Magnificent

Kennington

Highgate

Relief panel from the Harpy Tomb

Caffeine in Tea

St Bartholomew the Great (West Smithfield)

Rulers

Bronze hoplite helmet

Elgin amphora

Introduction (part two)

News from our friends
Into the future
Elizabeth II HAS REIGNED in a world moving swiftly through political shifts, cultural change and technological advances. Traditional institutions of law, religion and politics have suffered loss of ...
Elizabeth II (1952 - )
Princess Elizabeth Alexandra Mary was born at 17 Bruton Street, London on 21 April 1926. A happy childhood was spent with her parents, the Duke and Duchess of York, and younger sister Margaret Rose. ...
Edward VIII and George VI (1936 - 1952)
Edward VIII (1936) Edward, Prince of Wales, eldest son of George V and Queen Mary, was known to the family as 'David'. Charming and informal, he was a popular prince, touring Britain and the empire, ...
George V (1910 - 1936)
Edward vii's eldest son Albert died at the age of 28, and so it was his second son, George, who followed him as king. George had learned the navy's traditions of duty and. Blue-eyed, blunt, and ...
House of Windsor
When Queen Victoria died in 1901, she left three generations of heirs. They, it was expected, would reign as monarchs of the House of Saxe-Coburg-Gotha. In fact, the name survived only 16 years. In ...
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Peter Paul Rubens (1577-1640), Isabella BrantThis famous portrait drawing is of Rubens’ first wife, ...
Waterloo suicidesFor centuries people have been committing or attempting...
The queen of vintage - Hilary ProctorThere's only one thing more fabulous than Hilary Pr...
The Blues and RoyalsIn 1969 The Royal Horse Guards (The Blues) were amalgam...
London Oratory (Brompton Road)The Congregation of the Oratory was founded in Rome by ...
London bridge (part twelve)After the opening in 1836 of London Bridge station, the...
Clocks and watches - Martyn Stamp"1970s watches are very popular right now, whereas...
Guy's Hospital ChapelThe benefaction by which Thomas Guy founded the well-kn...
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The Liberty of the ClinkFrom 1127, the 80 acres adjoining the Thames was governed according to the laws of ‘The Liberty of the Bishop of Winchester’. ‘Liberty’ did not mean that everyone could do as he or she liked. The bishop provided a definition of ‘liberty’ and then required all that lived within his area to live according to it. ‘Liberty’ was another word for ‘jurisdiction’ over the manor (similar to how a modem borough council governs a district today). By the 15th century, the lengthy term ‘Liberty of the Bishop of Winchester’ had been shortened to ‘Liberty of The Clink’.
The Bishop’s PalaceIn 816 a church council ordered that all ecclesiastical establishments must have a place to confine offending monks who might have been neglecting their pious duties through laziness, quarrelling or drinking. In 1076 an archbishop listed the types of punishments that could be used, which included scourging (whipping) with rods and silent solitary confinement.



SouthwarkSouthwark is the most ancient of all the London boroughs, older than both Westminster and the City of London. A fact often overlooked is that before the Roman army could build the first ever bridge over the Thames in AD43, they had to make camp on the islands of solid ground amid the marshes that made up the south shore; these were eventually to become Southwark. This southern settlement became the place for soldiers, engineers and builders to relax after a long day building Londinium.
A prison is a grave to bury men alive…“A prison is a grave to bury men alive… it is a microcosm, a little world of woe, it is a map of misery… It is a place that hath more diseases predominant than the Pest-house in the Plague time, and it stinks more than the Lord Mayors dogge-house, or Paris Garden in August…”
The Clink Prison“The Clink” Prison that gave its name to all others!