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Marble figurine of a woman
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THE ISOLATED POSITION of the Cycladic islands in the Aegean Sea meant that Cycladic culture developed traditions that remained unchanged for centuries. An example of this is the characteristic Cycladic marble figurine, produced for hundreds of years.

It is not known why the figurines were made or who they represented. The most common type are the ‘folded arm’ figurines such as this unusually large example. The form of these figurines is reduced to a few key components; facial features and other details were often originally painted on. The survival of these details on this figurine is remarkable. It is possible to make out almond-shaped eyes, a necklace and two rows of dots around the brow that may indicate a diadem. There is also a clear dotted pattern on the right cheek, which, along with traces of paint elsewhere on the face, shows that it was originally extensively covered with bright, perhaps even garish, patterns.

Marble figurine of a woman


From the Cyclades, Aegean Sea, Early Bronze Age, c. 2700-2500 вс
Ht 76.5 cm



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