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Codex Zouche-Nuttall
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Тhis is part of one of a small number of Mexican codices (screenfold manuscript books) known to have survived the Spanish Conquest of 1521. Hundreds or even thousands of such books were made, but most were destroyed by Spanish missionaries who considered them to be manifestations of evil.

Mexican manuscripts do not contain written information in word form, but pictures and ideographs (symbols that represent ideas) are used to aid the reader in reciting the contents aloud.

This example was produced by scribes of the Mixtec peoples from the region of Oaxaca. It contains two narratives: one side of the document relates the history of important centres in the Mixtec region, while the other, starting at the opposite end, records the genealogy, marriages and political and military feats of the Mixtec ruler, Eight Deer Jaguar-Claw. This ruler is depicted at top centre, next to his calendric name (eight circles and a deer's head).

Codex Zouche-Nuttall


From Mexico, Mixtec, Late Postclassic period (AD 1200-1521) L. 113.5 cm Hi 19 cm Given by Baroness Zouche of Haryngworth




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