,
Random
Embankment

East Ham

Southwark Cathedral (part two)

Calcite-alabaster stela

Londesborough brooch

The handbag diva - Vicky Sleeper

Stepney Green

Mask of the Nulthamalth (fool dancer)

Tea leaf grading

Old Royal Naval College Chapel

Millennium Bridge (part three)

Preen yourself

A walk down Portobello (part two)

Blackfriars Bridge (part five)

Sword from the armoury of Tipu Sultan (1750-99)

News from our friends
XML error in File: http://www.anglophile.ru/en/rss.xml
XML error: Not well-formed (invalid token) at line 2
Most Popular
Peter Paul Rubens (1577-1640), Isabella BrantThis famous portrait drawing is of Rubens’ first wife, ...
Waterloo suicidesFor centuries people have been committing or attempting...
The queen of vintage - Hilary ProctorThere's only one thing more fabulous than Hilary Pr...
The Blues and RoyalsIn 1969 The Royal Horse Guards (The Blues) were amalgam...
London Oratory (Brompton Road)The Congregation of the Oratory was founded in Rome by ...
London bridge (part twelve)After the opening in 1836 of London Bridge station, the...
Clocks and watches - Martyn Stamp"1970s watches are very popular right now, whereas...
Guy's Hospital ChapelThe benefaction by which Thomas Guy founded the well-kn...
Discussed
Advertisement
Hawai’ian feather cape
 (голосов: 0)
This cape made of bird feathers showed the importance and status of its wearer. In the Hawai’ian islands of Polynesia, only men of high status were such featherwork regalia in ceremonies and battle. The cape is made from olona fibre (Touchardia latifolia) netting, on to which tiny bundles of feathers have been attached in overlapping rows. The red feathers come from the i’iwi bird (Vestiaria cocchinea), and the yellow and black feathers from the o’o (Moho nobilis). Red feathers were reserved for those of highest rank, but yellow feathers became the most highly prized colour due to their rarity.

Large numbers of feathered cloaks and capes were given as gifts to the sea captains and their crews who were the earliest European visitors to Hawai’i. Captain Cook himself was presented with five or six feathered cloaks during his last, fatal, visit there in 1779. It is not known, however, who brought this particular cape back to Britain.

Hawai’ian feather cape


From Hawai’I, Polynesia, probably before AD 1850.
W. 70 cm.
Gift of Sir AW Franks.



Информация
Посетители, находящиеся в группе Гости, не могут оставлять комментарии к данной публикации.